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20121129
20121207
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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
basically -- basically, they are tony blair to george w. bush's margaret thatcher. they have said, we have to keep 98% of the bush tax cuts in place for the betterment of the economy. >> it's so much bigger than that. >> they have won. >> republicans won. >> we have won. tax breaks. >> so to give a couple of percentage points to 2% of people. >> it could be so much bigger because the conversation has been shifted to how do we reduce our deficit. >> brian sullivan, thank you so much. greatly appreciate your insights. thanks for being with us on "way too early." you can catch brian on cnbc's "street signs" at 2:00 p.m. he is the hardest working man in show business, or at least on the other side of the river. >>> coming up this morning, we've got republican senator tom coburn. can't wait to talk to tom. also, tom cole will be here on set. that's great. we're going to ask him what he was thinking last week. i'm joking. congressman. also, democratic senator claire mccaskill. can you believe this? and congressman chris van hollen. also, we're going to bring in former national security adviser d
for george w. bush. donna, you know hillary clinton and you know her so well. the poll numbers look pretty stunning, but you know, it's easy to talk about something in the hypothetical, then someone runs and people start finding out all kinds of bad things about you. what do you think? first of all, there are 1,422 days until the next big presidential election. >> who's counting, donna? >> i'm always counting. i think secretary clinton is a phenomenal woman. she has been a proven leader at the state department. she has not only the right credentials if she decides to run, but i believe that right now, she's focusing on the job at hand. tomorrow, she'll be i think she's giving a human rights speech in ireland and beyond that, i think she just want to complete her tenure as secretary of state. perhaps rest, revive and get herself back into the campaign lifestyle that maybe she wants to get back into, but i think she has enough time to figure out what she wants to do. perhaps write a book on her amazing accomplishments and to think about 2016, perhaps sometime in 2014. she has time. >> her hu
of 1990 at andrews air force base where george h.w. bush went in there. we forget now how incredibly overwhelming the deficit story was at that point. you know, you look at that administration. the coming in, just no one thought they could do anything. it's not unlike the conversations we're having now. and they went in, they did the deal, president bush had to shift from read my lips to as only he could put it, read my hips. and it was good for the country, it created a political dynamic that cost president bush the election in 1992, and which we're still living, because that gave us grover norquist, et cetera. >> let's get to grover norquist in a minute, but i do have a question. the gop plan consists of $2.2 trillion in savings over a decade. that includes raging the eligibility age for medicare from 65 to 67. and lowering cost of living increases for social security benefits. they also propose overhauling the tax code to generate $800 billion in new revenue. but without raising taxes on the wealthy. in a letter to the president, leading republicans compared their plan to one ersk
from the expiration of the george w. bush tax cuts for the top 2%. now, i want to make this clear. i said this earlier as it's worth repeating because it's not said very often. every american taxpayer gets a tax reduction. the superwealthy to the very minimum taxpayer in this nation gets a reduction in what the president is proposing and that is to continue the current tax rate on those under $250,000, adjusted gross income. for those who have income over and above that, they get that tax reduction and above that they are going to pay an additional amount up to 3.9% in two different traunches. so everyone gets a tax break, but those superwealthy, the 2%, they're going to pay for and that will amount to a substantial amount of money over 10 years and frankly they've had 12 years of really low, low taxes, the lowest taxes really ever since the 1930's. the president has also proposed something that's very important. we talked about this last week. i want to talk about this again the next time we come here and that is, how do we grow jobs, how do we put people back to work? the president
think history showed whether it's ronald reagan or-- >> ronald reagan, george w. bush and-- >> your a telling me that ronald reagan was not increasing deficits. stuart: ronald reagan increased-- >> here is what we're arguing about, you lower tax rates, you get more revenue. >> stuart. stuart: that's a lesson of economic history. >> stuart, i'm sorry. stuart: it is. >> the lesson of the reagan years and bush years, you-- >> it's factually true that when you lower rates, ronald reagan did it, dramatic lower of rates, the revenue to the treasury doubled in five years. that's true. >> are you telling me. stuart: you're saying, oh, he left a deficit. it was congressional spending that led it a deficit. let's get back to the original argument. if you now, right now, lowered tax rates you would increase revenue to the treasury. >> you and i disagree on that. you and i disagree on that and i know my history and-- >> you think that by imposing higher tax rates, massive tax increase. >> no, no, not on everyone, not on everyone. stuart: tell me how you're going to get growth when you raise tax
of the things -- i mean come you covered george w. bush. i wrote for books on him. there was a lot of mystery about what bush felt -- yes, a gut player. as he said, his job was to put some calcium in the spine. but i think obama is a little bit more of an uncertain figure and quite frankly when he writes his own autobiography and his time as president and there is more excavation of all of this, we're going to discover that he's working it out as he plays the game. somebody with a little more experience under their belt might not be doing. >> some other comments you he made about president obama including but she just said executive subtext or little disappointed or underwhelmed. >> i wouldn't say disappointed. it goes to the question of what is our job in the news media. our job is to be, "politico" specializes in a 242nd, not in a hostile negative way, but you are asking and raising questions and that's the job. look, what's happened in the last many decades in the presidency, increasing concentration of power. there's the catastrophe in japan in the united states immediate need they want t
dispensaries, more than in the entire eight years under george w. bush. so it is just insane and i'm really disappointed that the white house was willing to say the people of colorado and washington state have spoken, so be it. 1-866-55-press. if you want to get a comment in about pot as well, always welcome. on the my2k, peter what's happening on the social network? >> we'll start in the chat room. current.com/billpress. you can chat with fellow "full court pressers" there and share your my2k reasons. ph says good morning the annual $2k means to me is savings contribution to my i.r.a. i don't have a work pension from my job. taking care of my children, elderly parents and self-employment. >> bill: there it is. if we're lucky right we have a little extra money left over and that we can -- before we pay taxes, put it in an i.r.a. and let that build up and build interest. i've done that for the last 20, 25 years. and $2,000 in an i.r.a. every year really adds up. >> we're also on twitter at bpshow. lots of people
tolerate will. >> let me take you both back. george w. bush, john kerry. they talked on the phone about healing and they never talked again. and kerry served on the senate. i mean -- okay, but let's imagine. i'm just going to go with will and look upon this as glass half full. what if, roland -- what if mr. obama could find something for romney to do and romney agreed to do it? >> yeah. white house usher. there's a lot of jobs mitt romney could do for the president. look, first of all, if we're going to do this lunch don't do it at the white house. the president should have taken mitt romney to ben's chili bowl, get a half smoked and he could meet the 47%. i have no problems with it but i certainly think for mitt romney it's going to be one heck of a lunch, having to see the president sit there and smile at him and say you know i kicked your behind. you know i did, didn't you? i think there is a role for individuals who run for president of the united states in terms of still operating in the public space. because, again, we need all ideas on the table. so i'm sure the president, he's g
i only do at halloween. >> stephanie: we remember being there for the george w. bush inauguration.. [ wah wah ] it should have been a sign of things to come. >> you made me stand out in the cold for your inauguration tickets. >> stephanie: i did? >> yes. >> stephanie: i suck. >> you were wearing open-toed shoes. >> stephanie: granted i was a diva but i didn't know how long you would have to wait. will you go get my tickets. >> and it was cold. >> stephanie: cutting to later that same day. chris lavoie's extremities oh, i hate that. the boner to the president. >> sound byte: it's time to tell the american people what spending cuts they're really willing to make. >> stephanie: oh hush up. senator schumer. >> sound byte: we're waiting for some specifics somewhere for our republicans colleagues to show us that they're serious on negotiations. >> that's specific for you. is this specific enough for you? >> stephanie: theyesterday. >> sound byte: the spending cut proposal must be a rhetorical question, because we have put very specific spending cut proposals. >> stephanie: eric cantor s
assistant to george w. bush in the white house. he is a policy advisor and senate majority leader to bill crist and worked in the senate in pennsylvania. he has great experience in matters of the house and senate. he is very unique and at the top of the pure land and his time spent in grassroots efforts for senate rules and precedents. he has also worked with the rick santorum campaign. he has also published works in political theory. our poor speaker will be brian darling. he is from the heritage foundation for the time being. he is part of the senate counsel and for now he is senior fellow of government studies here at the heritage foundation. he monitors political event here at the senate, white house, and various policy decisions on things in general. he is very prolific. he has a wonderful media presence and cable, radio, and tv. he is literally one of the most widely quoted analysts at the heritage foundation. he is a graduate from boston university and he was previously in the senate for senator martinez and two other candidates. he has an extensive and deep background. so we will
. these tax cuts were enacted by george w. bush in 2001. still a bad idea then, i believe. at any rate, we had a surplus. it was sold to the american people because we have a surplus, we ought to give money back. we'll have the tax cuts across the board which benefitted mostly the wealthiest of americans. we knew that at the time. they were adopted as a temporary measure. what part of temporary doesn't john boehner understand? what part of temporary don't these republicans understand, right? i mean what is it about suddenly suddenly, it's become gospel. it is sacrosanct that you can never raise tax on the richest of americans. the very ones i'm one of them, who ought to be paying more in taxes. it is just insane! so they were attempted as a temporary measure and they're going to expire in ten years. why in ten years? because everybody knew in ten years things might change. we might no longer have a surplus and we might need the money. that's exactly what the case is today. president obama extended them for two
and regretting that as much as george w. bush saying he looked into vladimir putin's eyes and saw his soul. this is, after all -- please explain to us, if you will, while all the gushing goes forth from the white house and others, explain how we got to this point where the muslim promised after mubarak's fall that they would not seek power and then they grabbed ultimate power and then he consolidated power and then he crushed the judiciary on thanksgiving day, and now we're sitting here wondering whether in the words of rich lowery we're in a position where it's meet the new pharaoh, same as the old pharaoh. >> well, this comes up in our interview as well. there are two lines of thinking on this. so some would argue and morsi himself would argue that he was simply trying to protect the constitutional process from a judiciary that was pro mubarak, that was trying to actually quash this democratic process and thwart democracy and freedom in egypt. that's the pro morsi line of thinking. the other line of thinking is that the muslim brotherhood is more hard line than they would claim to be, th
percent of the vote. >> so in 2000 you got 80 plus percent of the vote? >> not too bad. >> and george w. bush won the presidency. >> i see where you're going. >> no. i'm just saying, just people need to look at the fact that there's more than one reality. barack obama wasn't the only person who won. i'm not saying this to denigrate the president or elevate the president. i'm explaining the negotiations right here. you get 80% -- i got 80%, you know, when i ran in, you know -- actually ran unopposed in '98. in '9d6 i got 83%. i didn't give a damn what they said. they didn't call and say i got elected, joe, with 52% of the vote, you've got to go with me. i said that's great, mr. president, i got 80%. >> he probably did do that because he tried to make social security reform the centerpiece. >> right, and it didn't work. >> republicans didn't support it. >> it didn't work. david? >> joe, isn't one of the big questions here what boehner ultimately does is a legislative strategy, not just trying to deal with folks who won in their districts and who are opposed to taxes, but does he put a bil
trust anything democrats agreed to when we have had a history going back to george h. w. bush where he promised to raise taxes, and the democrats were going to lower -- cut spending $2 for every dollar that he raised? what happened, he had said, read my lips, no new taxes. would he agree to do this, the democrats piled on. why in the world should they trust anything the democrats promise as far as spending cuts are concerned. guest: let's go back to the earlier question, do they live up to the deficit-reduction law's the past. it is true they sometimes pass spending cuts and then reverse them. -- laws they have passed. it is true they sometimes pass spending cuts and then reverse them. it kind of works on both sides, but i suppose why should republicans trust democrats? democrats also did not know if they should trust republicans. that is why we're in a little bit of a gridlock here. host: we began our conversation with sam goldfarb of cq roll call by talking about a so- called tax extenders. a quick definition? guest: temporary tax breaks usually directed to the small type of business
governor in 2006. before that a top political advice sor in the white house of george w. bush. he attended the university of delaware from 1988 to 1993. david plouffe crossed paths in schmidt in the late 1980's. he completed his political seasons degree and finned two years ago. he has completed two presidential bids. he was appointed as a senior advice sor to the president in the white house in 2011. he attended is the marks high school before serving in a wide viret of state and national political campaigns. i'm going to ask the two speakers this evening to speak and i had to decide who is going to go first and i decided to use a standard that anyone this this audience could mean and that is whoever has won the most recent presidential election gets to speak first. i think that's the fair enough thing to do so please welcome david plouffe and steve schmidt to the university of delaware. [applause] >> thank you for joining thus evening. it's great to be back where steve and i had our interest in politics fostered and have such great memories of the university and its faculty and the commu
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)